Pre-Twitter Racist Rant

Race-baiting before social media? Here’s an excerpt from “Don’t Be a Sucker” – a short film which warns of the dangers of promoting racism in America. It was produced by the United States Department of War and released in 1943 (and adapted as a slightly shorter version in 1947.)

This dramatized film uses the experience of a Hungarian American to warn against the dangers of persecuting minorities. Reacting to a hate-filled political speech in an American city, he recalls how similar speeches led to Nazi persecution of minority groups and the eventual destruction of German society. The film was also made to make the case for the desegregation of the United States armed forces. It is held for preservation by the U.S. National Archives. Full 23 min version here.

Was the U.S. Justified in Dropping the Atomic Bombs on Japan?

This semester my EdMethods students used Microsoft Sway for their final lesson design projects. This document-based lesson by Nicole Matier students examine a variety of source material in preparation for a debate.

Students will use these sources to construct an argument to debate the question: Was the U.S. justified in dropping the atomic bombs on Japan?

After you read these documents you are going to create a thesis statement in response to the essential question. Be sure to collect evidence from the text to support your thesis statement. When doing this consider whether the evidence you are choosing appeals to a reader through ethos, pathos or logos.

For a direct link to the Sway click here
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Wounded Knee Massacre

This semester my EdMethods students used Microsoft Sway for their final lesson design projects. This document-based lesson by Nick Campagna asks student to use original source documents to explore different accounts of the Wounded Knee Massacre.

How do we analyze primary sources to construct a history of the Wounded Knee Massacre?

~ Nick Campagna

After you read these documents you are going to create a thesis statement in response to the essential question. Be sure to collect evidence from the text to support your thesis statement. When doing this consider whether the evidence you are choosing appeals to a reader through ethos, pathos or logos.

For a direct link to the Sway click here
More lessons in this series.
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Image / Library of Congress:
Burial of the dead at the battle of Wounded Knee, S.D.
Summary: U.S. Soldiers putting Indians in common grave; some corpses are frozen in different positions. South Dakota.
Created / Published c1891 Jan. 17.

Soldiers’ Life on the Frontlines – WWI

This semester my EdMethods students used Microsoft Sway for their final lesson design projects. This document-based lesson by Gabriel Bruneau asks student to use original source documents as prompts to reflect on soldiers’ experience in WWII.

How should our society view military service and its experiences in times of war?

Essential Question

After you read these documents you are going to create a thesis statement in response to the essential question. Be sure to collect evidence from the text to support your thesis statement. When doing this consider whether the evidence you are choosing appeals to a reader through ethos, pathos or logos.

For a direct link to the Sway click here
More lessons in this series.
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Image credit: British soldiers of World War One – The 21st Battalion, London Regiment (1st Surrey Rifles) Flickr/ DesertBlooms

Equality on the Front, but What Waits at Home?

This semester my EdMethods students used Microsoft Sway for their final lesson design projects. This document-based lesson by Jana Peters asks student to put themselves in the shoes of an African American soldier returning to the US from WWI. Original source documents from black soldiers like Henry Johnson and Horace Pippin are used as the basis for creation of reflective journal entries.

“The history of the American Negro is the history of this strife, — this longing to attain self-conscious manhood, to merge his double self into a better and truer self. In this merging he wishes neither of the older selves to be lost… He simply wishes to make it possible for a man to be both a Negro and an American…”

~ W.E.B Dubois

For a direct link to the Sway click here
More lessons in this series.
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